Duke Awards Tenure to Faculty Members

September 21, 2021

Faculty

Here we recognize and celebrate associate professors who have recently been awarded tenure on campus through the campus tenure review process.

Earning tenure after a rigorous review process by peers and leaders inside and outside Duke is a testament to the caliber of each individual faculty member and the impact of their research, teaching and mentoring, and their reputation among their peers. It is also, in a way, an invitation to be a partner in shaping the future of Duke and its mission, playing a role in advancing its academic excellence and making it a more equitable and engaged institution.

Congratulations!

Fadi A. Bardawil
Associate Professor of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies
Fadi A. Bardawil is associate professor of Asian and Middle Eastern studies in the Trinity College of Arts & Sciences. His research focuses on the traditions of intellectual inquiry of contemporary Arab thinkers and the international circulation, and translations, of critical theory. He is the author of “Revolution and Disenchantment: Arab Marxism and the Binds of Emancipation.” Other publications include “Critical Theory in a Minor Key to Take Stock of the Syrian Revolution,” in “A Time for Critique,” “Césaire with Adorno: Critical Theory and the Colonial Problem,” in the South Atlantic Quarterly and “The Solitary Analyst of Doxas: An Interview with Talal Asad” in the journal Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Bardawil’s work spans across three languages: English, French and Arabic. He earned his Ph.D. in anthropology from Columbia University. In 2016-17, he was a member of the School of Social Science at the Institute for Advanced Studies in Princeton.
Appointment Date: July 1, 2021

Susanna Caviglia
Associate Professor of Art, Art History & Visual Studies

Susanna Caviglia earned her degrees at the Sapienza University in Rome and the Pantheon-Sorbonne University in Paris. Her research interests focus on French and Italian Art in the long 18th century, early modern theory and practice of drawing, representations of the body in art and cross-cultural relationships within the Mediterranean world. She is the author of Charles-Joseph Natoire, 1700-1777 (2012) and History, Painting, and the Seriousness of Pleasure in the Age of Louis XV (2020), and the co-editor of “L’événement ‘tragique’ aux époques moderne et contemporaine: définition, representations,” “Le prince et les arts en France et en Italie, XIVe-XVIIIe siècles” and “Body Narratives: Motion and Emotion in the French Enlightenment.” Before joining Duke, Professor Caviglia taught at the University of Limoges in France and the University of Chicago. In France, she acquired curatorial expertise working at the Centre Georges Pompidou, the Musée Condé in Chantilly, the Musée du Louvre and the Musée des Beaux-Arts in Nîmes. Professor Caviglia is the editor-in-chief of the series The Body in Art (Brepols) and the field editor for 18th-century art for caa.reviews.
Appointment Date: July 1, 2021

James Chappel
Associate Professor of History
James Chappel is associate professor of history in the Trinity College of Arts & Sciences. His first book is titled “Catholic Modern: The Challenge of Totalitarianism and the Remaking of the Church.” The book is primarily an intellectual history of European Catholics between the 1920s and 1960s, focusing on their conceptualization of the family, the economy and the state. It argues that the experiences of the 1930s were a watershed in the history of the Church, as the twin threats of fascism and (especially) Communism pushed Catholic thinkers toward a wholly renovated form of social Catholic ethics. This book led him to an interest in the imagination and administration of old age (Catholic politicians, and Catholic ideals of the family, were formative to European pension regimes). This will constitute his second book project, under contract at Basic Books. Tentatively titled “End of Life: The Past and Future of Old Age,” the book will ask how the meaning of old age has changed in the past century, and how it might change again as millennials grow old. 
Appointment Date: July 1, 2021

Anna Cieslak
Associate Professor of Finance
Anna Cieslak is an associate professor of finance at the Fuqua School of Business, working at the intersection of asset pricing, macroeconomics and monetary economics. Her agenda spans two related domains of macrofinance. The first area studies the dynamics of interest rates and their relationship with the macroeconomy; the second explores the interactions between central banks and financial markets. She has recently focused on central bank communication, particularly on understanding the channels through which the Federal Reserve impacts financial markets. Her work shows that since the mid-1990s, the Fed has responded to stock market downturns with policy accommodation and has affected the market by reducing risk premia. Cieslak’s research has been published in the top academic outlets such as the Journal of Finance, the Review of Financial Studies, and the Journal of Financial Economics. It has also been featured in news outlets such as the Wall Street Journal and the Economist. She is a faculty research fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research and serves as an associate editor at the Journal of Finance, the Review of Financial Studies and the Review of Finance. She holds a master’s degree in economics from the Warsaw School of Economics in Poland and a Ph.D. degree in economics from the University of Lugano in Switzerland. Before joining Duke in 2015, she was on the finance faculty at Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management.
Appointment Date: July 1, 2021

Lawrence David
Associate Professor of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology
Lawrence David is associate professor of molecular genetics and microbiology in the School of Medicine. He has been named a Beckman Young Investigator, Searle Scholar, a Hartwell Investigator, an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow, a Damon Runyon-Rachleff Innovator and a Burroughs Wellcome Investigator  in the Pathogenesis of Infectious Disease. David’s research has been funded by the National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, NC Biotechnology Center, the Burroughs Wellcome Fund and others. He previously was a junior fellow at the Harvard Society of Fellows. He earned his Ph.D. in computational and systems biology from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and completed his undergraduate studies in biomedical engineering from Columbia University.
Appointment Date: May 1, 2021

Emily Derbyshire
Associate Professor of Chemistry
Emily Derbyshire is associate professor of chemistry in the Trinity College of Arts & Sciences with a secondary appointment in the Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology in the School of Medicine. Her goals are to address global health issues by working at the interface of chemistry and biology. She graduated from Trinity College in Connecticut with honors in chemistry and participated in a summer internship in pharmacology and preclinical development at Tularik Inc. (currently Amgen) in South San Francisco. She earned her Ph.D. from the University of California – Berkeley. At Berkeley, Derbyshire completed her graduate studies with Michael A. Marletta where she focused on the biochemical study of an enzyme relevant to human health. For her postdoctoral studies, she conducted research in Jon Clardy’s lab at Harvard Medical School. At Harvard, Emily developed a chemical genetic screen to discover inhibitors of liver stage malaria as a National Institutes of Health (NIH) postdoctoral fellow. She is the recipient of the NIH Director’s New Innovator Award, the Ralph E. Powe Junior Faculty Award, the American Chemical Society Infectious Diseases Young Investigator Award, the American Association for the Advancement of Science Marion Milligan Mason Award, and the Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award.
Appointment Date: July 1, 2021

Tarek Elgindi
Associate Professor of Mathematics
Tarek Elgindi is associate professor of mathematics in the Trinity College of Arts & Sciences. He is a recipient of the NSF CAREER Award for his project titled “Formation of Small Scales and Dissipation in Incompressible Fluids.” Elgindi is also a recipient of a Sloan Foundation fellowship in mathematics by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. He earned his Ph.D. from New York University.
Appointment Date: July 1, 2021

Jordan Etkin
Associate Professor of Business Administration
Jordan Etkin is associate professor of marketing at the Fuqua School of Business. She studies goals — how people set them and pursue them, and their effects on motivation, performance and well-being. Her research tackles questions regarding how motivation changes over time, how the way goals are structured impacts their pursuit, how perceiving conflict between goals affects people’s judgments and behavior, and how goals shape personal resource expenditures and vice versa. Other interests include unintended consequences of personal quantification and tracking enjoyable behaviors. Etkin’s research is published in top-tier academic journals, including Journal of Consumer Research, Journal of Marketing Research and Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. Her work has also received coverage in prominent popular press outlets, such as the New York Times, BBC, Huffington Post, The Atlantic, Fast Company and Business Insider. She received her Ph.D. in 2013 and teaches the Marketing Core class to Daytime MBA students at Fuqua.
Appointment Date: July 1, 2020

Gustavo Furtado
Associate Professor of Romance Studies
Gustavo Procopio Furtado is associate professor of romance studies and art, art history and visual studies in the Trinity College of Arts & Sciences. His research and teaching interests include Latin American literature and cinema, film and media theory, modernity and modernism in the Global South, travel writing; ecocriticism and ecocultural studies, and ethnographic and indigenous film. His book “Documentary Filmmaking in Contemporary Brazil: Cinematic Archives of the Present” examines forms of documentary-making that emerged during Brazil’s most recent period of democratization (roughly from 1985 to 2016) with particular attention to the democratization of film itself as a cultural practice and to the significance of the concept of the archive for the documentary genre. The book won the 2019 Antonio Candido Prize for Best Book in the Humanities (awarded by the Brazil section of the Latin American Studies Association). His current research projects included an exploration of the role of visual media in shaping, informing and contesting distinct territorial imaginings of the Amazon during the 20th and 21st centuries. 
Appointment Date: July 1, 2020

Rong Ge
Associate Professor of Computer Science
Rong Ge is associate professor of computer science in the Trinity College of Arts & Sciences. His research interest focuses on theoretical computer science and machine learning. Ge is a recipient of the NSF CAREER Award for his project titled “Optimization Landscape for Non-convex Functions – Towards Provable Algorithms for Neural Networks.” He was awarded a fellowship by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation in 2019. Prior to joining as faculty at Duke, Ge held a postdoctoral position with Microsoft Research – New England. He earned his Ph.D. from Princeton University.
Appointment Date: July 1, 2021

Lauren Ginsberg
Associate Professor of Classical Studies
Lauren Ginsberg is associate professor of classical studies in the Trinity College of Arts & Sciences. Her research centers on Latin literature with a special focus on the early Roman empire. She is the author of “Staging Memory, Staging Strife: Empire and Civil War in the Octavia,” winner of the First Book Award by the Classical Association of the Middle West and South, and co-editor of “After 69 CE – Writing Civil War in Flavian Rome.” Other publications appear in the Classical Journal, Transactions of the American Philological Association, American Journal of Philology and Classical Philology. In 2017-18 she was a Rome Prize Fellow at the American Academy of Rome. Ginsberg earned her Ph.D. from Brown University.
Appointment Date: July 1, 2020

Polly Ha
Associate Professor of the History of Christianity
Polly Ha is associate professor of the history of Christianity in the Divinity School. Her research focuses on the history of Christianity and the construction of diverse confessional and ecclesiastical traditions in the Reformation and post-Reformation world. She specializes in reception studies of the Reformation, ecclesiastical thought, historical method, political theology, and the wider impact of reformation on men and women across the social order. She has published numerous articles on reformation reception and co-edited a volume with Patrick Collinson on “The Reception of Continental Reformation in Britain.” Ha’s monograph “English Presbyterianism, 1590-1640” challenged traditional assumptions about the development of reformed polity in pre-civil war England and the nature of popular participation in reformed communities by analyzing English exiles in the Netherlands and New England. Ha’s work also addresses the political and social research of ecclesiastical independence in the English Revolution, its expansion of classical notions of liberty, and implications for the freedom of speech, association, consent, and conscience. She is chief editor of “The Puritans on Independence and Reformed Government,” which include debates over conciliarism, historical contingency and institutional mutability in response to Richard Hooker’s “Laws of Ecclesiastical Polity.” She is currently working on the longer-term impact of reformation, reconfigurations of the relationship between religion and politics, and broader intellectual change and social innovation in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. She earned her B.A. from Yale University and Ph.D. from the University of Cambridge.
Appointment Date: June 1, 2021

Amanda Hargrove
Associate Professor of Chemistry, Biochemistry
Amanda Hargrove is associate professor of chemistry in the Trinity College of Arts & Sciences with a secondary appointment in the basic sciences division in the School of Medicine as associate professor of biochemistry. Her lab studies the structure, function and therapeutic potential of long noncoding RNAs (IncRNAs) by harnessing the unique properties of small organic molecules. Hargrove’s research is funded by the National Institutes of Health, NSF CAREER Award, United States Army Medical Research Acquisition Activity, the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation and many others. Her publications include articles in Chemical Society Reviews, Chemical Communications, Nature Communications, Journal of the American Chemical Society and Organic & Biomolecular Chemistry. Before coming to Duke in 2013 as a member of the Duke Cancer Institute, she held a National Institutes of Health Postdoctoral Fellowship in Chemistry at the California Institute of Technology. She earned her Ph.D. from the University of Texas – Austin and B.S. from Trinity University.
Appointment Date: July 1, 2020

Sharique Hasan
Associate Professor of Business Administration
Sharique Hasan is associate professor of business administration in the Fuqua School of Business with a secondary appointment in the Department of Sociology in Trinity College of Arts & Sciences. Hasan studies social networks, careers and entrepreneurship. His research explores how networks help people learn complex ideas, and what types of network connections enhance individual and firm performance. His recent work examines the effect of increasing digitization on individual and firm performance. His research is published or forthcoming in leading journals including Strategic Management Journal, Management Science, Organization Science, the American Sociological Review and Administrative Science Quarterly. He also serves as an associate editor for Management Science and is on the editorial boards of Organization Science and Strategic Management Journal. Hasan received his B.S. in computer science and philosophy from Rutgers University and his Ph.D. in organizational theory and management from Carnegie Mellon University’s Heinz College. His doctoral dissertation won the Herbert A. Simon Doctoral Dissertation Award. Prior to Duke, he was an associate professor of organizational behavior at Stanford University’s Graduate School of Business.
Appointment Date: July 1, 2021

Stacy Horner
Associate Professor of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology
Stacy Horner is an associate professor of molecular genetics and microbiology in the School of Medicine. She is also the co-director of the Duke Center for RNA Biology. She earned her B.A. in biochemistry and chemistry from Gustavus Adolphus College in Minnesota and earned her Ph.D. in 2007 from Yale University, where she studied human papillomaviruses under the mentorship of Daniel DiMaio. Her postdoctoral research, sponsored by the Irvington Institute Fellowship Program of the Cancer Research Institute, was with Michael Gale at the University of Washington, and focused on hepatitis C virus regulation of antiviral innate immunity. Research in her lab at Duke is defining the cell biological and post-transcriptional RNA regulation of “Flaviviridae” viral infection at the level of both the virus and the host response. Specifically, her lab is studying how these viruses replicate, the mechanisms that regulate antiviral innate immunity to these viruses, and the post-transcriptional RNA regulatory controls to both of these processes. Horner has received the Ann Palmenberg Junior Investigator Award from the American Society for Virology, the ASM Microbe Junior Investigator Award, and both the Milstein Young Investigator Award and the Christina Fleischmann Award from the Cytokines Society. She is also a Burroughs Wellcome Fund Investigator in the Pathogenesis of Infectious Disease. She teaches in the Graduate Virology & Viral Oncology and RNA Biology courses.
Appointment Date: May 1, 2021

Jeremy Kay
Associate Professor of Neurobiology
Jeremy Kay is associate professor of neurobiology in the basic sciences division of the School of Medicine with a secondary appointment in ophthalmology. He studies how neural circuits devoted to specific visual processing tasks arise during development of the retina, and the consequences for circuit function when development goes wrong. His research is funded by the National Institutes of Health, Foundation Fighting Blindness, Pew Charitable Trusts and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. He is published in several academic journals including Nature Communications and PLOS Biology. Kay earned his Ph.D. from the University of California – San Francisco.
Appointment Date: December 1, 2020

Matthias Kehrig
Associate Professor of Economics
Matthias Kehrig is associate professor of economics in the Trinity College of Arts & Sciences. He is also a faculty research fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research and research affiliate at the Center for Economic Policy Research. Kehrig’s research interests lie in micro-founded macroeconomic questions and range from productivity, firm dynamics and the organization of production to the economics of uncertainty. His research has received funding from the National Science Foundation, Fritz Thyssen Foundation and UniCredit Foundation. He earned his Ph.D. from Northwestern University.
Appointment Date: July 1, 2021

Adam Levine
Associate Professor of Mathematics
Adam Levine is associate professor of mathematics in the Trinity College of Arts & Sciences. His research covers low-dimensional topology, the study of shapes of three- and four-dimensional spaces and of curves and surfaces contained therein. Levine’s research can be found in academic journals such as Geometry & Topology, Journal of Topology, Advances in Mathematics and Forum of Mathematics, Sigma. He serves as director of diversity and inclusion for the mathematics department. Before joining Duke in 2017, he held a faculty position at Princeton as assistant professor and an NSF postdoctoral fellowship at Brandeis University. Levine earned his Ph.D. from Columbia University and A.B. from Harvard University.
Appointment Date: July 1, 2020

Brian McAdoo
Associate Professor of Earth and Ocean Sciences
Brian McAdoo is associate professor of earth  and ocean sciences in the Nicholas School of the Environment. His research focuses on how geophysical hazards, such as earthquakes, tsunamis, landslides or extreme climate events, interact with the human environment to pose risks to marginalized populations. He was a member of the United Nations post-disaster reconnaissance team that documented the effects of the historic 2004 tsunami in the Indian Ocean that killed nearly 280,000 people and caused $13 billion in damages. He has also conducted assessments of tsunami risks in Japan; hurricane impacts in the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico; landslide risks in Nepal; avalanche risks in the United States; and post-earthquake recovery in Haiti. McAdoo’s faculty career began with 15 years at Vassar College in New York and 8 years as a founding professor of environmental science at Yale-National University of Singapore, Asia’s first four-year liberal arts college. He earned his doctoral degree in Earth Sciences, with a focus on submarine geomorphology, in 1999 from the University of California – Santa Cruz. He earned a diploma in science in geology in 1992 as a Fulbright Scholar at the University of Otago in Dunedin, New Zealand, and his bachelor of science degree in geology in 1991 from Duke, where his faculty advisor was Paul Baker, professor of earth and ocean sciences. Since earning his Ph.D. in 1999, he has authored or co-authored more than 45 peer-reviewed studies, presented more than 45 invited seminars, and developed and taught more than a dozen different undergraduate courses —nearly all interdisciplinary in scope and interactive in nature — on topics including oceanography, global geophysics and plate tectonics, planetary health and Foundations of Science, a common curriculum course for non-science majors.
Appointment Date: July 1, 2021

Steven Malcolmson
Associate Professor of Chemistry
Steven Malcolmson is associate professor of chemistry in the Trinity College of Arts & Sciences. His research focuses on the discovery of novel methods for the efficient and selective synthesis of small molecule scaffolds through the design and development of new catalysts. Earning his Ph.D. from Boston College, Malcolmson went on to hold a postdoctoral fellowship at Harvard Medical School before joining Duke as faculty in 2013. His research has been funded by the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation and the American Chemical Society. Publications include articles in Science, The Journal of the American Chemical Society and ACS Catalysis.
Appointment Date: July 1, 2020

Matthew Masten
Associate Professor of Economics
Matthew Masten is associate professor of economics in the Trinity College of Arts & Sciences. He is an econometrician working on identification and causal inference with a current focus on robustness and sensitivity analysis. He is a recipient of the NSF CAREER award. Masten is published in academic journals such as Econometrica, The Review of Economic Studies, Quantitative Economics and The Review of Economics and Statistics. He earned his Ph.D. from Northwestern University before joining Duke faculty in 2013.
Appointment Date: July 1, 2021

Devon Noonan
Associate Professor in the School of Nursing, with Tenure
Devon Noonan is an associate professor in the School of Nursing. She is a certified addictions registered nurse and family nurse practitioner with a clinical focus in community/public health. She received her B.S.N. at Boston College, her M.S. in Nursing at Georgetown University, and her M.P.H. and Ph.D. at the University of Virginia. She completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Michigan. Noonan’s research is focused on using community-engaged approaches to develop innovative health behavior change interventions, including digital interventions, with the goal of reducing risk for chronic diseases including cancer and cardiovascular disease. Noonan’s work has a strong focus on rural and medically underserved populations. Much of her work also focuses on tobacco cessation. She has been continuously funded by the National Cancer Institute for the past five years to examine text-based intervention approaches for tobacco cessation in rural and medically underserved populations. Noonan teaches and mentors students across all programs at DUSON and is the co-director of the Duke National Clinician Scholars Program.
Appointment Date: May 1, 2021

Miroslav Pajic
Dickinson Family Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering
Miroslav Pajic is Dickinson Family Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering in the Pratt School of Engineering and the director of the Cyber-Physical Systems Lab. His research interests focus on design and analysis of cyber-physical systems with varying levels of autonomy and human interaction, at the intersection of (more traditional) areas of embedded systems, AI, learning and controls, formal methods and robotics. He earned his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from the University of Pennsylvania. Pajic is an associate editor in the ACM Transactions on Computing for Healthcare and served as co-chair of the 2019 ACM/IEEE International Conference on Cyber-Physical systems. Pajic is the recipient of several accolades including the NSF Early CAREER award, IEEE TCCPS Early-Career award, Young Investigator Program-Office of Naval Research award and the ACM SIGBED/SIGSOFT Frank Anger Memorial award.
Appointment Date: July 1, 2020

Jay Pearson
Associate Professor in the Sanford School of Public Policy
Jay Pearson is associate professor in the Sanford School of Public Policy. His research examines how policy-sponsored structural inequality influences social determination of health. A native of Hertford County, North Carolina, Pearson’s early experiences in the rural agricultural south shaped his academic interests and inform his research agenda. Pearson began his public health career as a U.S. Peace Corps volunteer in Honduras where he worked on child survival. Upon returning to the U.S. he worked as a health educator with the East Coast Migrant Health Project. Pearson served as assistant project director of an NIH-funded research study in which he was responsible for primary data collection in an ethnically diverse Detroit community. While pursuing his doctoral degree at the University of Michigan, Pearson began to study the social determinants of population health. He is particularly interested in the health effects of conventional and nonconventional resources associated with racial assignment, sociocultural resources, national origin, immigration and cultural orientations.
Appointment Date: July 1, 2021

Marcos Rangel
Associate Professor in the Sanford School of Public Policy
Marcos A. Rangel is an applied microeconomist and associate professor of public policy in the Sanford School of Public Policy. His research focuses on the patterns of accumulation of human capital with particular attention to the intra-family decision process (parents and children), to the impact of policies to foment education and health and to racial differentials. His research has contributed to a better understanding of how the negotiations between mother and fathers, and also how families insert themselves into societies, influence the allocation of resources toward investment in human capital of children. Rangel is a research affiliate with the Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab at MIT, the Bureau for Research and Economic Analysis of Development, the Population Research Center at NORC/University of Chicago and the Duke Population Research Institute. He is also an associate editor of the Journal of Development Economics. 
Appointment Date: July 1, 2020

Galen Reeves
Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering
Galen Reeves joined the faculty at Duke in Fall 2013, and is currently an associate professor with a joint appointment in the Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering and the Department of Statistical Science. He completed his Ph.D. in electrical engineering and computer sciences at the University of California – Berkeley in 2011, and he was a postdoctoral associate in the Department of Statistics at Stanford University from 2011 to 2013. His research interests include information theory and high-dimensional statistics. He received the NSF CAREER award in 2017.
Appointment Date: July 1, 2020

Karin Reuter Rice
Associate Professor in the School of Nursing, with Tenure
Karin Reuter Rice is an associate professor in the School of Nursing, School of Medicine and the Duke Institute for Brain Sciences. She is an acute care pediatric nurse practitioner with the Division of Pediatric Critical Care. Reuter-Rice is a clinical expert in pediatric critical care and a fellow of the American College of Critical Care Medicine, American Academy of Nursing and the NIH-NINR Summer Genetics Institute. She is co-editor of the textbook Pediatric Acute Care: A Guide for Interprofessional Practice. Her commitment to the care of critically ill and injured children and their families has led Reuter-Rice to focus her research in the area of trauma and brain injury. With a collaborative research team approach and National Institutes of Health – National Institute of Nursing Research, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and industry support, she examines the relationship between biological processes, physiologic responses and neurocognitive/functional outcomes in children who have experience a brain injury. In her work she has developed a specimen biorepository, which allows her to further advance the science in pediatric brain injury. Her published research findings have been presented internationally and have led to new practice recommendations for children at risk for neurologic injury while hospitalized in the intensive care unit. In her role of chair of the North Carolina Brain Injury Advisory Council’s Children and Youth Committee, she develops health policies that support brain injury prevention and recovery. In addition to her research, she teaches and mentors future scientists, students and clinicians.
Appointment Date: May 1, 2021

Deondra Rose
Associate Professor in the Sanford School of Public Policy
Deondra Rose is an associate professor of public policy in the Sanford School of Public Policy with secondary appointments in political science and history in the Trinity College of Arts & Sciences. She is also the director of Polis: Center for Politics. Her research focuses on the feedback effects of landmark social policies on the American political landscape. In addition to U.S. public/social policy, Rose’s research and teaching interests include higher education policy, American political development, political behavior, identity politics (e.g., gender, race, and socioeconomic status) and inequality. She is the author of “Citizens by Degree: Higher Education Policy and the Changing Gender Dynamics of American Citizenship.” Rose’s research has appeared in Studies in American Political Development, the Journal of Policy History, the Journal of Women, Politics & Policy and PS: Political Science & Politics.
Appointment Date: July 1, 2021

Gregory Samanez-Larkin
Jack H. Neely Associate Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience
Gregory Samanez-Larkin is Jack H. Neely Associate Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience in the Trinity College of Arts & Sciences. His research examines the psychology and neuroscience of how motivation and learning influence decision making and health behavior across the life span. He has been awarded funding for training programs and research from the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation and the FINRA Investor Education Foundation. Samanez-Larkin is published in several academic journals including Nature Neuroscience, Nature Reviews Neuroscience, Neuron, the Journal of Neuroscience and Psychological Science. He earned a B.A. at the University of Michigan after transferring from the University of Michigan, Flint, and earned his Ph.D. from Stanford University.
Appointment Date: July 1, 2020

Ryan Shaw
Associate Professor in the School of Nursing, with Tenure
Ryan Shaw is faculty at the School of Nursing and School of Medicine. His research focuses on how patient-generated health data from wearable devices, mobile phones and other emerging technologies can be used to manage and improve health outcomes in patients with chronic illnesses. With these tools he engineers new models of care delivery that capitalize on the growing digital health infrastructure of health systems and society. His work is funded by the National Institutes of Health and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, among others. He teaches classes in health informatics and is a mentor to students who will become the next generation of health scientists and clinicians.
Appointment Date: September 1, 2020

Candis Watts Smith
Associate Professor of Political Science
Candis Watts Smith’s expertise highlights race and ethnicity's role in shaping the American political landscape. Her research agenda illuminates the ways in which demographic dynamics influence citizens’ and denizens’ of the U.S. understanding of their own identity, their political attitudes and their policy preferences. It also examines the extent to which public resources are distributed in equitable ways. In addition to publishing in peer reviewed journals, textbooks and the public sphere, she is the author of three books, Black Mosaic: The Politics of Black Pan-Ethnic Diversity, Stay Woke: A People’s Guide to Making All Black Lives Matter and Racial Stasis: The Millennial Generation and the Stagnation of Racial Attitudes in American Politics. She is also the co-editor of Black Politics in Transition: Immigration, Suburbanization, and Gentrification. Prior to her appointment at Duke University, she was a member of the Departments of Political and African American Studies at Penn State. She is a co-host of the Democracy Works Podcast and a TEDx alumna.
Appointment Date: July 1, 2021

Sophia Smith
Associate Professor in the School of Nursing, with Tenure
Sophia Smith is an associate professor at the School of Nursing and earned her Ph.D. and M.S.W. degrees at the University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill School of Social Work. Her research explores ways to improve the quality of cancer care including post-treatment survivorship and palliative care with a primary focus on leveraging technology in delivering behavioral health interventions to the community. She is leading efforts to integrate clinical cancer care and research as a means to build the body of scientific evidence that forms the foundation of evidence-based practice through her recent leadership as Association of Oncology Social Work Research Director and membership on the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) Survivorship Guidelines Panel and American Society of Clinical Oncology Survivorship Committee. Smith’s research has been funded by the National Institutes of Health, the American Cancer Society, NCCN and Pfizer Grants for Independent Learning and Change.
Appointment Date: June 1, 2020

Lucia Strader
Associate Professor of Biology
Lucia Strader is associate professor of biology in the Trinity College of Arts & Sciences. Her research focuses on a molecular understanding of auxin signaling, auxin homeostasis and auxin crosstalk with other hormones. Publications include articles in academic journals such as the Molecular Cell, PNAS and Developmental Cell. Strader earned her Ph.D. from Washington State University in 2004 and joined as faculty at Duke in 2020.
Appointment Date: July 1, 2020

Jessi Streib
Associate Professor of Sociology
Jessi Streib is an associate professor of sociology. Her research uncovers mechanisms and builds theories about how social class inequality is experienced, reproduced and alleviated. She has written three book manuscripts: “The Power of the Past: Understanding Cross-Class Marriages,” “Privilege Lost: Who Leaves the Upper Middle Class and How They Fall” and “The Luckocracy: How Working Class and Middle Class College Graduates Receive Equal Pay.” Strieb earned her Ph.D. from the University of Michigan – Ann Arbor.
Appointment Date: July 1, 2021

Anna Sun
Associate Professor of Religious Studies
Anna Sun is associate professor of religious studies in the Trinity College of Arts & Sciences. She earned her Ph.D. in sociology from Princeton and her B.A. from the University of California – Berkeley. Sun is a scholar of Confucianism in particular and of contemporary Chinese religious life in general. Her research interests include the 19th century production of knowledge about Chinese religions; the development of Global Confucianisms in the 21st century; comparative ritual theory; and theoretical and methodological issues underlying the social scientific study of religion. Her first book, “Confucianism as a World Religion: Contested Histories and Contemporary Realities,” received the Distinguished Book Award in sociology of religion from the American Sociological Association, and the Best First Book in the History of Religion Award from the American Academy of Religion. Sun has been vice president of the Society for the Study of Chinese Religions and is serving her second term as co-chair of the Chinese Religions Unit of the American Academy of Religion.
Appointment Date: July 1, 2020

Brittany Wilson
Associate Professor of New Testament
Brittany Wilson is an associate professor of New Testament at the Divinity School. Her research focuses on issues related to embodiment, gender and the senses within the New Testament and the ancient world more broadly. Her first book, “Unmanly Men: Refigurations of Masculinity in Luke-Acts,” won the Manfred Lautenschläger Award for Theological Promise. Her current book, “The Embodied God: Seeing the Divine in Luke-Acts and the Early Church,” explores the question of divine embodiment and received a 2016-2017 sabbatical grant for researchers from the Louisville Institute. She has published in a number of academic journals and edited volumes, and she serves on a variety of editorial boards and steering committees within the field of biblical studies. She earned her Ph.D. from Princeton Theological Seminary in 2012.
Appointment Date: July 1, 2020

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By Maggie Elliott