Duke Faculty Promoted or Appointed to the Rank of Full Professor

November 2, 2021

promoted to full

Congratulations to our Duke faculty who have been promoted or appointed to the rank of full professor. Promotion and appointment to full professor is the culmination of a rigorous review by the faculty’s academic peers inside and outside Duke and by the academic leaders at the department, school and campus levels. The review process looks for distinction and impact in research, teaching, service and engagement, and for leadership in the faculty’s area of expertise nationally and internationally. All these colleagues embody and exemplify the academic excellence that is so essential to fulfilling Duke’s mission of education, discovery and engagement. Congratulations!

Francesco Bianchi
Professor of Economics

Francesco Bianchi is a professor of economics in the Trinity College of Arts & Sciences and a research professor at Johns Hopkins University for the 2021-2022 academic year. He is a member of the Center for Economic and Policy Research and the National Bureau of Economic Research and an associate editor of the Journal of Monetary Economics, Quantitative Economics and the Journal of Applied Econometrics. Bianchi received his Ph.D. in economics from Princeton University in 2009. He has held visiting positions at the University of California at Los Angeles, New York University, University of Pennsylvania and Northwestern University. In 2015 he was awarded the Wim Duisenberg Research fellowship and in 2010 he received the Zellner Thesis Award in Business and Economic Statistics. He has published in the American Economic Review, the Review of Economic Studies, the Review of Economics and Statistics, The Journal of Monetary Economics and other leading academic journals. Currently, Bianchi’s main research interests involve the role of agents’ beliefs in explaining macroeconomic dynamics, the interaction between monetary and fiscal policy and macro-finance.
Appointment Date: July 1, 2021

Mark Edward Borsuk
Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Mark Borsuk’s research concerns the development and application of mathematical models for integrating scientific information on natural, technical, and social systems. He is a widely-cited expert in Bayesian network modeling with regular application to environmental and human health regulation and decision making. He is also the originator of novel approaches to climate change assessment, combining risk analysis, game theory, and agent-based modeling. Borsuk’s highly collaborative research has been funded by NSF, EPA, NIH, NIEHS and USFS, and he has authored or co-authored 75 peer-reviewed journal publications and 6 book chapters. Borsuk received the Chauncey Starr Distinguished Young Risk Analyst Award from the Society for Risk Analysis in 2013 and the Early Career Research Excellence Award from the International Environmental Modelling and Software Society in 2008. Before joining the Duke faculty, Dr. Borsuk was a member of the Dartmouth College faculty for 10 years where he held an appointment in the Thayer School of Engineering. Dr. Borsuk received a B.S.E. in Civil Engineering and Operations Research from Princeton University, an M.S. in Statistics and Decision Sciences from Duke University, and a Ph.D. in Environmental Science and Policy from Duke University. He did his post-doctoral training in the Department of Systems Analysis, Integrated Assessment, and Modelling (SIAM) at the Swiss Federal Institute for Aquatic Science and Technology (EAWAG), where he advanced to head of the Decision Analysis and Integrated Assessment group. As part of his appointment at Duke, Dr. Borsuk directs a new interdisciplinary research and teaching initiative in risk, uncertainty, optimization and decision-making.
Appointment Date: July 1, 2021

Kenneth Brown
Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Kenneth Brown is professor of electrical and computer engineering in the Pratt School of Engineering and physics in the Trinity College of Arts & Sciences. His research interests include the control of quantum systems for both understanding the natural world and developing new technologies. His current research areas focus on the development of the robust quantum computers and the study of molecular properties at cold and ultracold temperatures. Awards include being a Fellow of the American Physical Society, an Experienced Research Fellow with the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation and a Kavli Fellow with the Kavli Foundation and National Academy of Science. Brown earned his B.S. from the University of Puget Sound and Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkley.
Appointment Date: January 1, 2021

Frank Bruni
Eugene C. Patterson Professor of the Practice of Journalism and Public Policy

Frank Bruni is the Eugene C. Patterson Professor of the Practice of Journalism and Public Policy in the Sanford School of Public Policy. He joined the Duke faculty in 2021 after 25 years at the New York Times, where he served as metro reporter, White House correspondent, Rome bureau chief, chief restaurant critic and most recently as an Op-Ed columnist. He was the first openly gay Op-Ed columnist at the Times and in 2016 was honored by the National Lesbian and Gay Journalists Association with the Randy Shilts Award for his lifetime contribution to LGBTQ equality. He is the author of three New York Times best sellers: a 2015 examination of the college admissions frenzy, “Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be”; a 2009 memoir, “Born Round,” about the joys and torments of his eating life; and a 2002 chronicle of George W. Bush’s initial presidential campaign, “Ambling into History.” His first cookbook, “A Meatloaf in Every Oven,” was published in February 2017 and co-written with his Times colleague Jennifer Steinhauer. His forthcoming book, “The Beauty of Dusk: On Vision Lost and Found,” which reflects on his imperiled eyesight and the challenges of aging, will be published in March 2022. Bruni joined the Times from the Detroit Free Press, where he was, alternately, a war correspondent, the chief movie critic and a religion writer. He has worked as a general-assignment writer for the Detroit Free Press and the New York Post. He has taught at Princeton University and been active at his alma mater, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, as an advisor on improving the undergraduate experience and the liberal arts curriculum.
Appointment Date: May 13, 2021

Stephen Buckley
Eugene C. Patterson Professor of the Practice of Journalism and Public Policy

Stephen Buckley is the Eugene C. Patterson Professor of the Practice of Journalism and Public Policy in the Sanford School of Public Policy. He is a veteran editor and educator who worked at The Washington Post, Tampa Bay Times and the Poynter Institute. He joined the Duke faculty in July 2021. Buckley, a 1989 Duke graduate in political science, has had a wide-ranging career as a local reporter, foreign correspondent, editor and journalism educator. After graduating from Duke, Buckley spent 12 years at The Post as a local reporter and foreign correspondent. He covered education, courts and the night police beat and then became a foreign correspondent, initially as the Post’s Africa Bureau Chief and then the paper’s first correspondent based in Brazil. He returned to St. Petersburg, Florida in 2001 as a national reporter for the Times and then became an editor in charge of national and international coverage before being promoted to managing editor and then publisher of tampabay.com, the paper’s digital site. He moved to the Poynter Institute in 2010 as dean of the faculty. In 2015, he moved to Kenya, where he taught at The Aga Khan University before becoming the lead story editor for Global Press Journal, an international news organization that focuses its reporting on under-covered regions.
Appointment Date: May 13, 2021

M. Kate Bundorf
J. Alexander McMahon Distinguished Professor of Health Policy and Management

M. Kate Bundorf is J. Alexander McMahon Distinguished Professor of Health Policy and Management in the Sanford School of Public Policy. Her research focuses on health policy and the economics of health care systems. She has studied public and private health insurance markets, the organization of health care providers and consumer decision making in health care. Prior to joining the faculty at Duke, Bundorf was an associate professor of health research and policy at the Stanford University School of Medicine. She is also a faculty research fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research, the President-Elect of ASHEcon and a co-editor of The Journal of Health Economics. Bundorf received her M.B.A. and M.Ph. from The University of California at Berkeley and her Ph.D. from The Wharton School. She was a Fulbright Lecturer at Fudan School of Public Health in Shanghai, China during 2009 and 2010. Her research has been published in leading economic and health policy journals and has received funding from the U.S. National Institutes of Health, the Agency for Health Care Research and Quality and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. She received the 13th Annual Health Care Research Award from The National Institute for Health Care Management in 2007.
Appointment Date: January 1, 2021

Daniel Castelo
William Kellon Quick Professor of Theology and Methodist Studies

Daniel Castelo is the William Kellon Quick Professor of Theology and Methodist Studies in the Divinity School. During his doctoral work, he taught intensive Wesleyan theology courses in Mexico, Honduras and Brazil and afterward took a teaching post at a Mexican seminary for three years. Subsequently, he moved to the Pacific Northwest, where he taught dogmatic and constructive theology at Seattle Pacific University for fourteen years. Castelo has been an active participant in the Central American Methodist Course of Study program and recently has served as a doctoral mentor for the Hispanic Theological Initiative. He began his publishing career exploring the topic of divine attribution. This work resulted in the monograph “The Apathetic God,” for which he won a John Templeton Award for Theological Promise. He proceeded to consider questions surrounding a Christian account of theodicy, the doctrine of God broadly, and the theological interpretation of Scripture. Additionally, he has focused on the theology of renewal movements and Christian pneumatology. He currently has publishing contracts for books that explore Latinx theology and a Wesleyan doctrine of God.
Appointment Date: July 1, 2021

Mine Çetinkaya-Rundel
Professor of the Practice of Statistical Science

Mine Çetinkaya-Rundel is professor of the practice and director of undergraduate studies in the Department of Statistical Science. She is also an affiliated faculty in the Computational Media, Arts and Cultures program at Duke University. Her work focuses on innovation in statistics and data science pedagogy, with an emphasis on computing, reproducible research, student-centered learning and open-source education. Çetinkaya-Rundel works on integrating computation into the undergraduate statistics curriculum, using reproducible research methodologies and analysis of real and complex datasets.
Appointment Date: July 1, 2021

Joel Collier
Professor of Biomedical Engineering

Joel Collier is professor of biomedical engineering in the Pratt School of Engineering. His research specialty is in immune engineering, a new but rapidly growing field in which bioengineering approaches are used to modulate the immune system. He has made important contributions in self-assembling peptides and their application in vaccine development and cell delivery, particularly relevant in the COVID-19 pandemic. In addition to his impressive research record, he has worked tirelessly to improve the department’s student experience, supporting student-initiated efforts to discuss the impact of social issues on student life and strengthening the undergraduate and graduate biomaterials curriculum with the creation of two well-received courses he created. Collier earned his Ph.D. from Northwestern University.
Appointment Date: January 1, 2021

Shaundra Daily
Professor of the Practice of Electrical & Computer Engineering and Computer Science

Shaundra Daily is professor of the practice of electrical and computer engineering in the Pratt School of Engineering and computer science in the Trinity College of Arts & Sciences. Prior to joining Duke, she was an associate professor with tenure at the University of Florida in the Department of Computer & Information Science & Engineering. She also served as an associate professor and interim co-chair in the School of Computing at Clemson University. Her research focuses on the design, implementation, and evaluation of technologies, programs, and curricula to support diversity, equity, and inclusion in STEM fields. Her approach has focused on three key strategies: 1) Utilizing technology to support the development of interpersonal skills that will facilitate collaboration in diverse settings; 2) Developing technologies and programs geared towards making computing and engineering accessible to diverse identities; and 3) Mentoring, developing outreach, and researching the experiences of marginalized groups in computing and engineering. Having garnered over $43M in funding from public and private sources to support her research activities, Daily’s work has been featured in USA Today, Forbes, National Public Radio, and the Chicago Tribune. Daily earned her B.S. and M.S. in Electrical Engineering from the Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University – Florida State University College of Engineering, and a S.M. and Ph.D. from the MIT Media Lab.
Appointment Date: July 1, 2021

Ofer Eldar
Professor of Law

Ofer Eldar is a professor at the Duke University School of Law, where he teaches business associations and corporate governance. He also holds secondary faculty appointments at the Duke economics department and the Duke Fuqua School of Business, and he serves as a research fellow of the Duke Innovation & Entrepreneurship Initiative. His research interests include corporate governance, corporate finance, entrepreneurship, financial regulation, and business organizations. Prior to joining the Duke Law faculty, Eldar was the Wagner Fellow in Law & Business at the NYU Stern School of Business. His scholarship has appeared in leading economics, finance, and law journals, and featured in various major media outlets. Eldar earned his Ph.D. in financial economics from Yale University, and a J.S.D. from Yale Law School, where he was a Kauffman Fellow in Law & Economics. He practiced corporate law at Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer in London, and at Weil, Gotshal & Manges in New York.
Appointment Date: July 1, 2021

Sina Farsiu
Professor of Biomedical Engineering

Sina Farsiu is a professor of biomedical engineering in the Pratt School of Engineering and a professor of ophthalmology in the School of Medicine. He is also the director of the Vision and Image Processing (VIP) Laboratory. His laboratory develops advanced machine learning and biophotonics imaging tools to improve the health of young children and adults with ocular and neurological diseases (e.g., age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, Alzheimer, retinopathy of prematurity, and ALS). He earned his B.Sc. from the Sharif University of Technology in Iran, his M.Sc. from the University of Tehran, and his Ph.D. from the University of California at Santa Cruz. He is a Fellow of IEEE, SPIE, OSA and AIMBE.
Appointment Date: January 1, 2021

Lisa Gennetian
Pritzker Professor of Early Learning Policy Studies

Lisa Gennetian is Pritzker Professor of Early Learning Policy Studies in the Sanford School of Public Policy. She is an applied economist whose research straddles a variety of areas concerning child poverty from income security and stability to early care and education with a particular lens toward identifying causal mechanisms underlying how child poverty shapes children’s development. She is a co-PI on the first multi-site multi-year randomized control study of a monthly unconditional cash transfer to low income mothers of infants in the U.S. called Baby’s First Years. Her recent work bridges poverty scholarship with a behavioral economic framework. “The Persistence of Poverty in the Context of Economic Instability: A Behavioral Perspective,” describes such a framework for poverty programs and policy, co-authored with Dr. Eldar Shafir and her co-authored publication “Behavioral Economics and Developmental Science,” further advances the application of behavioral economic insights to the arena of children’s development. She has also co-edited a volume with scholar Marta Tienda for the ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science titled “Investing in Latino Children and Youth.” Gennetian has since launched the beELL initiative; applying insights from behavioral economics to design strategies to support parent and family engagement in, and enhance the impacts of, existing childhood interventions. Dr. Gennetian also has a body of research examining poverty among Latino children and families, serving as a PI on several grants and a co-PI directing work on poverty and economic self-sufficiency at the National Center for Research on Hispanic Families.
Appointment Date: July 1, 2021

Charles Gersbach
John W. Strohbehn Distinguished Professor of Biomedical Engineering

Charles Gersbach is the John W. Strohbehn Distinguished Professor of Biomedical Engineering in the Pratt School of Engineering. He is also the director of the Duke Center for Biomolecular and Tissue Engineering and the director of the Duke Center for Advanced Genomic Technologies. He received his Ph.D. in biomedical engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology and completed postdoctoral training at The Scripps Research Institute. His research interests are in genome and epigenome editing, gene therapy, regenerative medicine, biomolecular and cellular engineering, synthetic biology and genomics. His work has led to new approaches to study genome structure and function, program cell biology, and treat genetic disease. Gersbach’s work has been recognized through awards including the National Institutes of Health Director’s New Innovator Award, the National Science Foundation CAREER Award, the Outstanding New Investigator Award from the American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy, the Allen Distinguished Investigator Award, and induction as a Fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering. He is also the co-founder of three biotechnology companies and an advisor to several others.P
Appointment Date: January 1, 2021

Steven Haase
Professor of Biology

Steven Haase is professor of biology in the Trinity College of Arts & Sciences. His research group interests focus on understanding the biological clock mechanisms controlling cell division and host-pathogen interactions. His research receives funding from the National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. Haase is the senior author on a recent Science paper, entitled “An intrinsic oscillator drives the blood stage cycle of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum,” and has published in several prestigious journals. He earned his B.S. from Colorado State University and Ph.D. from Stanford University.
Appointment Date: July 1, 2021

Kerry Haynie
Professor of Political Science

Kerry L. Haynie is professor and chair of political science, professor of African & African American studies, and a former chair of Duke’s Academic Council (Faculty Senate), 2019-21. He earned B.A. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and a master’s degree from the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs at the University of Pittsburgh. Before coming to Duke in 2003, Haynie was a member of the faculty at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, and the University of Pennsylvania. Haynie’s research examines how the underlying theory, structures, and practices of American political institutions affect African Americans’ and women’s efforts to organize and exert influence on the political system. In 2012, he and his co-author Beth Reingold were the co-winners of the American Political Science Association’s Women and Politics Research Section’s Best Paper Award. In addition to articles in various academic journals, his publications include, “Race, Gender, and Legislative Representation: Toward a More Intersectional Approach” (with Beth Reingold and Kirsten Widner), winner of the 2021 Richard F. Fenno, Jr. Prize from the American Political Science Association for the best book in legislative studies.
Appointment Date: July 1, 2021

Andrew Douglas Hilton
Professor of the Practice of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Andrew Douglas Hilton is professor of the practice of electrical and computer engineering in the Pratt School of Engineering. He is also Pratt’s Director of Innovation in Computing Education. His main focus is on teaching professional-level programming skills to ECE’s master's students to prepare them for software engineering careers. Hilton teaches a 3-week introduction to Programming Python for Duke’s Master in Interdisciplinary Data Science, and Duke’s Center for Computational Thinking. He has two Coursera specializations, one in Java and another in C. Hilton earned his Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania.
Appointment Date: July 1, 2021c

Josh Huang
Professor of Neurobiology

Josh Huang is professor of neurobiology in the Basic Sciences division of the School of Medicine. His research combines multi-faceted approaches to study the organization, function, and assembly of brain circuits that orchestrate complex movements. His work receives funding from the National Institutes of Health. Huang joined Duke as faculty in 2020, after 20 years of research at the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory in New York. He earned his Ph.D. from Brandeis University in Massachusetts.
Appointment Date: March 1, 2021

Robin Kirk
Professor of the Practice of Cultural Anthropology

Robin Kirk is professor of the practice of cultural anthropology in the Trinity College of Arts & Sciences. She is a faculty co-chair of the Duke Human Rights Center at the Franklin Humanities Institute and is a founding member of the Pauli Murray Project, an initiative of the center that seeks to use the legacy of this Durham daughter to examine the region’s past of slavery, segregation and continuing economic inequality. An author and human rights advocate, she also directs the Human Rights Certificate. Her children’s book, “Righting Wrongs: 20 Human Rights Heroes from around the World,” will be published in 2022. Kirk is the author of "The Bond" fantasy trilogy, with a re-release of all three books scheduled for 2022. She's written three non-fiction books for adults, including “More Terrible Than Death: Massacres, Drugs and America’s War in Colombia” and “The Monkey’s Paw: New Chronicles from Peru.” She is a co-editor of “The Peru Reader: History, Culture, Politics” and co-edits Duke University Press’ “World Readers” series. An essayist and award-winning poet, she has published widely on issues as diverse as the Andes, torture, the politics of memory, family life and pop culture. Her essay on Belfast, “City of Walls,” is included in the Best American Travel Writing anthology of 2012. Kirk authored, co-authored and edited over twelve reports for Human Rights Watch, all available online. In the 1980s, Kirk reported for U.S. media from Peru, where she covered the war between the government and the Shining Path. She continues to write for US media, and has been published in The New York Times, Washington Post, Sojourners, The American Scholar, the Raleigh News and Observer, the Boston Globe, the Durham Herald Sun and other media. She earned her M.F.A from Vermont College and B.A. from the University of Chicago.
Appointment Date: July 1, 2021

Andrzej Kosinski
Professor of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics

Andrzej S. Kosinski is professor of biostatistics and bioinformatics in the Basic Sciences Division of the School of Medicine. He is also a member of the Duke Clinical Research Institute (DCRI). His research interests include statistical methodology for evaluation of diagnostic tests, adjustment for misclassification, clinical trials, and analysis of observational data. Kosinski’s research is funded by the National Institutes of Health, the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute, the Society of Thoracic Surgeons, and the American Heart Association. He joined Duke faculty in 2003. He earned his M.Sc. from the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom and Ph.D. from the University of Washington in Seattle.
Appointment Date: July 1, 2021

Tamar Kushnir
Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience

Tamar Kushnir is professor of psychology and neuroscience in the Trinity College of Arts & Sciences. Kushnir received her M.A. in Statistics and Ph.D. in Cognitive Psychology from the University of California at Berkeley, and was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Michigan. Before coming to Duke, Kushnir was a professor at Cornell University in the department of Human Development and the co-director of the Cornell Cognitive Science Program. Kushnir’s work is motivated by a long-standing curiosity about the developing mind, in particular how children acquire abstract, coherent knowledge of the natural and social world from ordinary experiences. She has published on a range of topics including how children use statistical patterns to infer causality, how we learn to detect trustworthy sources of knowledge, the developmental and cultural origins of our beliefs in free will and moral agency, how children learn and reason about social norms, and, most recently, the role of imagination in social and moral cognition. In addition to scholarly publications, Kushnir maintains an active in community engagement with local organizations that support young children and their families, especially museums and other spaces that provide opportunities for playful learning. Kushnir has served as an associate editor at Child Development and the Journal Cognitive Science, is a member of the Moral Psychology Research Group, and currently serves on the board of the Cognitive Development Society and as president-elect of the Society of Philosophy and Psychology.
Appointment Date: July 1, 2021

Eric Laber
Professor of Statistical Science

Eric Laber is professor of statistical science in the Trinity College of Arts & Sciences and biostatistics and bioinformatics in the Basic Science Division of the School of Medicine. Laber’s research uses data to solve real-world problems in areas such as personalized medicine, human trafficking, sports, wildlife conservation and artificial intelligence. His work is funded by the National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, DOD, among others. Laber joined Duke in 2020, having held a faculty position at North Carolina State University prior to that. He earned his M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor.
Appointment Date: January 1, 2021

Fan Li
Professor of Statistical Science

Fan Li is professor of statistical science in the Trinity College of Arts & Sciences with a secondary appointment at the department of biostatistics and bioinformatics in the Basic Science Division of the School of Medicine. Her main research interest is causal inference – designs and analysis for evaluating treatments and interventions in randomized experiments and observational studies, and their applications to health studies (also known as comparative effectiveness research) and computational social science. She also works on the interface between causal inference and machine learning. Li’s research receives funding from the Burroughs Wellcome Fund, Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, University of Notre Dame and the National Science Foundation. She joined Duke faculty in 2008. Li earned her B.S. from Peking University in China and Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins University.
Appointment Date: July 1, 2021

David MacAlpine
Professor of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology

David MacAlpine is professor of pharmacology and cancer biology in the Basic Science Division of the School of Medicine. His laboratory is interested in understanding the mechanisms by which the molecular architecture of the chromosome regulates fundamental biological processes such as replication and transcription. Specifically, how replication, transcription and chromatin modification are coordinated on a chromosomal scale to maintain genomic stability. MacAlpine’s research is largely funded by the National Institutes of Health with previous funding from the American Cancer Society, Inc. He earned his Ph.D. from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center’s Medical School.
Appointment Date: January 1, 2021

Ryan McDevitt
Professor of Business Administration

Ryan C. McDevitt is professor of business administration in the Fuqua School of Business with a secondary appointment in economics in the Trinity College of Arts and Sciences. Prior to joining Duke in 2013, he held faculty positions at the University of Rochester’s Simon School of Business and Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management. McDevitt’s work has been published in leading economics journals such as the American Economic Review, the Journal of Political Economy, the Quarterly Journal of Economics, and the Review of Economic Studies. His research is funded by the Washington Center for Equitable Growth, the National Science Foundation, and the National Bureau of Economic Research. He serves on advisory committees for the American Society of Nephrology and Renalogic. He has won teaching awards for his courses in economics, strategy, and econometrics. He earned his B.A from Williams College and Ph.D. from Northwestern University.
Appointment Date: July 1, 2021

Cameron McIntyre
Professor of Biomedical Engineering

Cameron McIntyre is professor of biomedical engineering in the Pratt School of Engineering and neurosurgery in the School of Medicine. His current research interests include Neural engineering, computational neuroscience, brain imaging and the design of human neuromodulation systems with special expertise in the biophysics of brain stimulation and recording. Prior to joining Duke in 2021, McIntyre held a faculty position at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation in 2003 and maintained a laboratory until 2012. In 2013 he moved his lab to the Case Western Reserve University to create the Case Neuromodulation Center. The current McIntyre Laboratory hopes to improve deep brain stimulation (DBS) for the treatment of movement disorders and provide the fundamental technology necessary for the effective application of DBS to new clinical arenas. He earned his B.S. and Ph.D. from Case Western Reserve University and held postdoctoral training at both Johns Hopkins University and Emory University.
Appointment Date: July 1, 2021

Louise Meintjes
Professor of Music

Louise Meintjes is professor of music and cultural anthropology in the Trinity College of Arts & Sciences. Her book “Sound of Africa! Making Music Zulu in a South African Studio” is an ethnography of a recording studio in Johannesburg in the early 1990s, a time of tumultuous political transition and musical innovation in South Africa. In her most recent book, "Dust of the Zulu: Ngoma Aesthetics after Apartheid," Meintjes traces the political and aesthetic significance of ngoma, a competitive form of Zulu men’s dance and music that emerged out of the legacies of colonialism and apartheid in South Africa. Contextualizing this performance practice within South Africa's history of violence, migrant labor, the HIV epidemic and the world music market, she follows a community ngoma team and its professional subgroup during the 20 years after apartheid's end. Meintjes earned her Hons-B.Mus. from the University of Stellenbosch in South Africa and M.M. and Ph.D. from the University of Texas at Austin.
Appointment Date: July 1, 2021

Edward Miao
Professor of Immunology

Edward Miao is professor of immunology and molecular genetics and microbiology in the Basic Science Division of the School of Medicine. He studies how immune cells detect intracellular infection, and how programmed cell death removes the infected cells from the body, studying a range of bacterial pathogens including Salmonella, Listeria, and rare environmental pathogens. Miao’s research has been featured in a number of notable academic journals including Science, Nature Immunology, Immunity, and Cell Host and Microbe. His research is largely funded by the National Institutes of Health. Miao joined Duke in 2020, having previously held a faculty position with the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He earned his M.D./Ph.D. from the University of Washington.
Appointment Date: March 1, 2021

Natalia Mirovitskaya
Professor of the Practice of Public Policy

Natalia Mirovitskaya’s professional focus is on political economy of development and peacebuilding. Following the completion of her Ph.D. from the Russian Academy of Sciences (Economics), Mirovitskaya has led and participated in numerous projects on the design, implementation and effectiveness of international resource regimes, environmental security, sustainable development and conflict prevention. Mirovitskaya’s experience has displayed an interdisciplinary approach linking theoretical advances with practical policy advice. She has co-authored “Development Strategies and Inter-Group Violence,” and co-edited “Economic Development Strategies and the Evolution of Violence in Latin America,” “Development Strategies, Identities, and Conflict in Asia,” and “The Economic Roots of Conflict and Cooperation in Africa.” Mirovitskaya’s most recent project is on Development for the New Arctic:  Visions, Strategies, Challenges at the Subnational and Local Level.  She is also co-editor of the Palgrave Macmillan series “Politics, Economics and Inclusive Development.” At Duke, Dr. Mirovitskaya teaches classes in Policy Analysis for Development, Policy Design, Research Methods, and Conflict-Sensitive Development. She has directed masters’ projects for fellows from over sixty countries, worked on executive education training of senior government officials and civil society leaders, and provided consultancies on security and sustainable development issues. She is a recipient of many research and teaching awards including the U.S. National Research Council Certificate of Appreciation for Outstanding Service and the Richard Stubbing Graduate Teaching.
Appointment Date: July 1, 2021

Christopher Monroe
Gihuly Family Presidential Distinguished Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Physics

Christopher Monroe is the Gilhuly Family Presidential Distinguished Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering in the Pratt School of Engineering and Physics in the Trinity College of Arts & Sciences. He is also the director of the Duke Quantum Center. Monroe is an experimental atomic and quantum physicist and engineer, with interests in fundamental quantum phenomena, quantum information science, and quantum computer design and fabrication. His research group pioneered most aspects of ion trap quantum computers, making the first steps toward a scalable, reconfigurable, and modular quantum computer system. Monroe is also co-founder and Chief Scientist at IonQ, a company near Washington, DC that builds quantum computers based on trapped atomic ions. He is an architect of the U.S. National Quantum Initiative and a member of the National Academy of Sciences.
Appointment Date: January 1, 2021

Joseph Nadeau
Professor of the Practice of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Dr. Joseph C. Nadeau is a professor of the practice of civil and environmental engineering in the Pratt School of Engineering. He joined the Duke faculty in 1997. For six years, he was the faculty-in-residence in Few Quad. He currently serves as director of undergraduate studies, ABET Coordinator and ASCE faculty advisor. He teaches courses in mechanics and structural design. His teaching has been recognized with multiple teaching awards from departmental, school and national sources. He received his doctorate from the University of California at Berkeley and his masters and bachelor’s degrees from MIT and Lehigh University, respectively. His research interests are in the areas of structural design and composite materials. He is a registered professional engineer.
Appointment Date: January 1, 2021

Kristen Neuschel
Professor of History

Kristen Neuschel is professor of history in the Trinity College of Arts & Sciences. She is also co-director of the Language, Arts and Media Program. Her research concentrates on late medieval and early modern France and Europe with a current focus on war and culture in northern Europe between 1400 and 1600 A.D. She is the author of two monographs, Living by the Sword (2020) and Word of Honor (1989), and co-author to several editions of a textbook, Western Civilization: Beyond Boundaries (2013). Neuschel teaches courses in the history of war, of gender relations, and in the writing and (at the graduate level) the teaching of History. She earned her B.A. from Denison University and M.A. and Ph.D. from Brown University.
Appointment Date: July 1, 2021

James Nolen
Professor of Mathematics

James Nolen is professor of mathematics in the Trinity College of Arts & Sciences. He studies partial differential equations and probability, which have been used to model many phenomena in the natural sciences and engineering with special interest in differential equations modeling random phenomena and whether one can describe the statistical properties of solutions to these equations. Nolen’s current research interests include reaction diffusion equations, homogenization of PDEs, stochastic dynamics and interacting particle systems. His research is funded by the National Science Foundation and was granted the CAREER award for “Research and training in stochastic dynamics.” He earned his B.S. from Davidson College and Ph.D. from the University of Texas at Austin.
Appointment Date: July 1, 2021

David Page
Professor of Biostatistics & Bioinformatics

David Page is professor and chair of the Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics in the Basic Science Division of the School of Medicine. He develops algorithms for machine learning and causal discovery, as well as applying them to biomedical data, especially de-identified electronic health records and high-throughput genetic and other molecular data. His research is funded by the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation. Page earned his Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.  He became involved in biomedical applications while a post-doc at Oxford University, and he was formerly a Kellett and Vilas Distinguished Achievement Professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison before moving to Duke.
Appointment Date: May 1, 2021

Henry Pickford
Professor of German Studies

Henry Pickford is professor of German studies in the Trinity College of Arts & Sciences. His research interests focus on modern philosophy and literature in German and Russian, with emphasis on the German philosophical tradition from Kant to critical theory. He is the author of “The Sense of Semblance: Philosophical Analyses of Holocaust Art,” “Thinking with Tolstoy and Wittgenstein: Emotion, Expression and Art” (also forthcoming in Russian translation), co-author of “In Defense of Intuitions: A New Rationalist Manifesto,” co-editor of “Der aufrechte Gang im windschiefen Kapitalismus: Modelle kritischen Denkens,” editor and translator of Theodor W. Adorno’s “Critical Models: Interventions and Catchwords” and “Selected Early Poems” of Lev Loseff and author of over twenty-five articles and book chapters. He is currently co-authoring the book “Adorno: A Critical Life” and co-editing the “Oxford Handbook to Adorno.” Pickford has a secondary appointment in Duke's Philosophy department. He earned his D.Phil. in Comparative Literature from Yale University and a M.A. in Philosophy from University of Pittsburgh.
Appointment Date: January 1, 2021

Shitong Qiao
Professor of Law

Shitong Qiao is professor of law and the Ken Young-Gak Yun and Jinah Park Yun Research Scholar at Duke Law School. He was a tenured professor at the University of Hong Kong, a Law and Public Affairs (LAPA) fellow at Princeton University, and the inaugural Jerome A. Cohen Visiting Professor of Law at NYU. He also taught law in Shenzhen and Shanghai. Professor Qiao is an expert on property and urban law with a focus on comparative law and China. His first monograph, “Chinese Small Property: The Co-Evolution of Law and Social Norms,” won multiple prizes from Yale, Tsinghua and Hong Kong. His works in progress include a book under contract with Cambridge titled “The Authoritarian Commons: Neighborhood Democratization in Urban China” and the first-ever empirical investigation of the Supreme People’s Court of China. He has advised the Shenzhen city government and the Ontario Securities Commission on Chinese land law and policies. 
Appointment Date: August 16, 2021

Sarah Bloom Raskin
Professor of the Practice of Law

Sarah Bloom Raskin, the former deputy secretary of the U.S. Department of the Treasury, was named the Colin W. Brown Distinguished Professor of the Practice of Law in 2021. A distinguished fellow in the Law School’s Global Financial Markets Center, she will become the center’s faculty director in January 2022. She is also a senior fellow in the Duke Center on Risk. From 2014 to 2017, Raskin was the second-in-command at the Treasury Department, where she was known for her pursuit of innovative solutions to enhance Americans’ shared prosperity, the resilience of the country’s critical financial infrastructure, and the defense of consumer safeguards in the financial marketplace. Earlier, Raskin was a governor of the Federal Reserve Board and a member of the Federal Open Market Committee. She also served as commissioner of financial regulation for the State of Maryland from 2007 to 2010. As a Rubenstein Fellow at Duke, Raskin collaborated with faculty across the university to improve understanding of markets and regulation. She led an agenda focused on shaping a new relationship between regulation and resilience in financial markets and deepening understanding of the management of systemic risks from diverse sources such as financial instruments, cyber breaches, and climate events. She also mentored and advised undergraduate and graduate students on careers in the public sector, guest-lectured in courses, participated in public events, and led collaborative research projects. Raskin, a graduate of Harvard Law School, has throughout her career worked across public and private sectors in both legal and regulatory capacities. Her private sector experience includes having served as managing director at the Promontory Financial Group, general counsel of the WorldWide Retail Exchange, and at the law firms of Arnold and Porter and Mayer Brown. Earlier in her career she served as banking counsel for the U.S. Senate Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs.
Appointment Date: August 1, 2021

Michael Reiter
James B. Duke Distinguished Professor of Computer Science and Electrical & Computer Engineering

Michael Reiter is James B. Duke Distinguished Professor of Computer Science in the Trinity College of Arts & Sciences and electrical and computer engineering in the Pratt School of Engineering. His research interests include all areas of computer and communications security, fault-tolerant distributed computing and applied cryptography. His previous positions included Director of Secure Systems Research at Bell Labs, professor of electrical and computer engineering and computer science at Carnegie Mellon University, and distinguished professor of computer science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He earned his Ph.D. from Cornell University.
Appointment Date: January 1, 2021

Ronald Rittgers
Professor of the History of Christianity, Duke Divinity Chair in Lutheran Studies

Dr. Rittgers’ research interests include the religious, intellectual, social and cultural history of medieval and early modern/Reformation Europe, focusing especially on the history of theology and devotion. Rittgers has served as the President of the American Society of Church History. His many publications include articles and book chapters in addition to books: “The Reformation of the Keys: Confession, Conscience, and Authority in Sixteenth-Century Germany;” “The Reformation of Suffering: Pastoral Theology and Lay Piety in Late Medieval and Early Modern Germany;” “The Reformation Commentary on Scripture: Hebrews and James;” a co-edited volume, “Protestants and Mysticism in Reformation Europe;” and “A Widower’s Lament: The Pious Meditations of Johann Christoph Oelhafen.” His next research projects will examine the intersection of consolation and self-understanding in the Age of Reform and the history of disenchantment in the Reformation and beyond. He additionally intends to work on essays that examine lament and love of God, respectively, in the theology of Martin Luther.
Appointment Date: June 1, 2021

Jennifer Siegel
Bruce R. Kuniholm Distinguished Professor of History and Public Policy

Jennifer Siegel Bruce R. Kuniholm Distinguished Professor of History in the Trinity College of Arts & Sciences and Public Policy in the Sanford School. She is an historian whose work focuses on the international and transnational nature of foreign relations and international security in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and the ways in which those relations were driven by political, cultural, social, and economic forces. Her research has centered in the areas of international diplomacy, finance, the origins of wars, the nature of alliances, and modern intelligence, with a particular focus to date on relations between and among the Entente powers of Britain, Russia and France on the European continent and in the imperial periphery. Her most recent book, “For Peace and Money: French and British Finance in the Service of Tsars and Commissars,” examines the globalized interconnectivity of finance and foreign policy in the context of British and French private and government bank loans to Russia in the late imperial period up to the Genoa Conference of 1922.
Appointment Date: July 1, 2021

J. Warren Smith
Professor of Historical Theology

J. Warren Smith is professor of historical theology in the Divinity School. His interest in the history of theology is broadly conceived from the apostles to the present, but his primary interest is the theology of the first six centuries of the Church. He is the author of “Passion and Paradise: Human and Divine Emotion in the Thought of Gregory of Nyssa,” “Christian Grace and Pagan Virtue: The Theological Foundation of Ambrose's Ethics,” and “Ambrose, Augustine, and the Pursuit of Greatness.” He is currently working on a volume for Eerdman’s Publishing tracing the development of theology from the Apostolic era with Ignatius of Antioch to the high-water mark of Byzantine thought with Maximos the Confessor, entitled “Early Christian Theology: A History.” Beyond that Smith is turning to a project, tentatively entitled “Plato and Christ: Platonism in Early Christian Theology,” that will examine the significance of the tradition called "Christian Platonism" for Christianity in a post-modern age. He is also a United Methodist minister in the North Carolina Annual Conference. Smith earned his Ph.D. from Yale University.
Appointment Date: January 1, 2021

Kevin White
Professor of the Practice of Business Administration

Kevin M. White is professor of the practice of business administration in the Fuqua School of Business. He is also vice president and director of athletics, emeritus. White earned his Ph.D. in education from Southern Illinois University in 1983 and currently teaches a sports business course as part of Fuqua’s Daytime MBA program. White guided Duke's Athletic Department from 2008-21 and spearheaded the implementation of the strategic plan approved by Duke’s Board of Trustees in April 2008. He led Duke Athletics to unprecedented success in competition, reshaped the organization into a more efficient department and implemented significant diversity and inclusion efforts for the entire department. White has mentored more than 30 current or former directors of athletics and conference commissioners. Prior to his arrival in Durham, White served as athletic director at the University of Notre Dame, Arizona State University, Tulane University, the University of Maine and Loras College in Iowa. He graduated from the Harvard Institute of Educational Management in 1985. He is a member of the United States Olympic and Paralympic Committee and former chairman of the NCAA Men’s Basketball Selection Committee.
Appointment Date: September 1, 2021

Justin Wright
Professor of Biology

Justin Wright is professor of biology in the Trinity College of Arts & Sciences with a secondary appointment in the Nicholas School of the Environment. His research focuses on understanding the causes and consequences of patterns of biological diversity across the planet. His research has received funding from the National Science Foundation, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, National Geographic Society, U.S. Army Research, Development & Engineering Command and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Wright joined Duke faculty in 2003. He earned his B.A. from Williams College and Ph.D. from Cornell University.
Appointment Date: July 1, 2021

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By Maggie Elliott